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Ralph Chesick Lasbury, Jnr.

Ralph Chesick Lasbury, Jnr.

Male 1906 - 1979  (72 years)

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  • Name Ralph Chesick Lasbury 
    Suffix Jnr. 
    Born 4 Sep 1906  East Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Name Ralph Cherokee Lasbury 
    Occupation Tobacco Grower 
    Findagrave Link http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=16281051 
    FamilySearch ID 9J7M-RGK 
    FamilySearch Link https://familysearch.org/tree/#view=ancestor&person=9J7M-RGK 
    Research Group Lasbury 
    Died 18 Mar 1979  Winter Park, Orange, Florida, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried South Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Center Cemetery, South Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
    Center_Cemetery_South_Windsor_Ct.jpg
    Ralph Cherick Lasbury, Jr (1906 - 1979) - Find A Grave Memorial
    Ralph Cherick Lasbury, Jr (1906 - 1979) - Find A Grave Memorial
    Grave of Ralph Chesick Lasbury Jnr.
    Grave_Ralph_Chesick_Lasbury_Jnr.jpg
    Person ID I305  Lasbury Family
    Last Modified 28 Apr 2017 

    Father Ralph Chesick Lasbury, Snr.
              b. 22 Feb 1875, East Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 11 Feb 1944, South Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Mother Eloise Jane Thrall
              b. 31 Mar 1874, East Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 27 Mar 1954, South Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married Abt 1901 
    Family ID F98  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Wife Cecilia Justice Chase
              b. 6 Aug 1905, Camden, Knox, Maine, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 17 May 1991, Orange County, Florida, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Married 1929  Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Marriage Licence number 580617
    Children 
     1. Ralph Chase Lasbury, I
     2. Cecillia Justice Lasbury
              b. 30 Aug 1931, East Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 15 Dec 2006, Camden, Knox, Maine, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     3. Joshua Coffin Lasbury
              b. 17 Aug 1934, East Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 7 Oct 2011, Camden, Knox, Maine, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     4. Benjamin Lee Lasbury
              b. 12 Jan 1936, East Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 6 May 1956, Burlington, Chittenden, Vermont, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 20 years)
     5. Abigail Samantha Lasbury
    Last Modified 26 May 2014 
    Family ID F99  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 4 Sep 1906 - East Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1929 - Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 18 Mar 1979 - Winter Park, Orange, Florida, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - South Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Ralph C. Lasbury Jnr, Lillian Lasbury, Lura Lasbury, Ardelle Lasbury and Clyde Lasbury
    Ralph_Jnr_Lillian_Lura_Ardelle_Clyde_Lasbury_1916.jpg
    Ralph C. Lasbury Jnr and Gertrude Arlene Lasbury
    Ralph C. Lasbury Jnr and Gertrude Arlene Lasbury

    Documents
    Connecticut State Journal
    Connecticut State Journal
    Connecticut growers did their part - Ralph C. Lasbury

    Cigar Industry threatened by Fertilizer Dearth
    Cigar Industry threatened by Fertilizer Dearth
    Connecticut tobacco growers declare they will be forced to suspend next years production.

    Newspapers
    Magazine Obituary for Ralph C. Lasbury Jnr - Page 1
    Magazine Obituary for Ralph C. Lasbury Jnr - Page 1
    Magazine Obituary for Ralph C. Lasbury Jnr - Page 2
    Magazine Obituary for Ralph C. Lasbury Jnr - Page 2
    Tobacco International Magazine Obituary for Ralph Chesick Lasbury Jnr.
    Tobacco International Magazine Obituary for Ralph Chesick Lasbury Jnr.
    Tobacco International Magazine Obituary for Ralph Chesick Lasbury Jnr.
    Tobacco International Magazine Obituary for Ralph Chesick Lasbury Jnr.

    Albums
    Barton Marcy's Album
    Barton Marcy's Album (45)
    Photos kindly provided by Barton Marcy

  • Notes 
    • Ralph C. Lasbury, Jr. Collection:
      The Shade Tobacco Growers Agricultural Association

      Windsor Historical Society
      96 Palisado Avenue, Windsor, CT 06095

      2005 Windsor Historical Society

      Full document at http://windsorhistoricalsociety.org/fa_lasbury.html

      Ralph C. Lasbury, Jr. was born September 4, 1906, in the Broad Brook section of East Windsor, Connecticut. He was the second child of Ralph C. Lasbury and Eloise Thrall. Lasbury Senior was one of Connecticut's important broadleaf tobacco growers. At one point, he had 500 acres of broadleaf growing.

      As a young boy, Ralph C. Lasbury, Jr. worked tobacco every summer. After high school, he went to Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida. He then worked for his father at the South Windsor Tobacco Company.

      In the early 1930's, Mr. Lasbury worked for Henry Trumbull in Plainville, Connecticut. He developed a type of humus for tobacco beds and received much praise from the shade tobacco growers.

      In 1939, he was appointed as the first Chairman of the Connecticut Marketing Authority in Hartford. He held that position until 1978. The Connecticut Regional Market in Hartford was one of his major accomplishments.

      Mr. Lasbury was appointed to the Farm Labor Committee of the State Defense Council in 1941. He and a number of tobacco men, including William S. Fuller, Albert Newfield, Lamarr Monroe, and Charles Huntington, developed a code of standards for tobacco workers. Hours, housing, and sanitary conditions were included in the unprecedented code.

      On November 30, 1942, Mr. Lasbury was hired as Executive Director of the Shade Tobacco Growers Agricultural Association. The first offices were established at 148 State Street in Hartford, Connecticut.

      One of his first duties was to develop a workable labor program. His program included the establishment of attractive youth camps, adult guidance proposals, and a "day-haul" system so that local teachers and students could earn extra money. Also, many corrective regulations were drawn up. These became the basis for the Farm Labor Law of 1947.

      Mr. Lasbury's job as spokesman for the tobacco growers brought him to the State Legislature. He also went to Washington to participate in Congressional hearings on tobacco labor and production problems.

      One of Mr. Lasbury's proficiencies was his public relations work. He and the Association produced a documentary film on shade tobacco. The film served as a teaching tool for the public and the sales people of the cigar industry.

      The 1960's saw more contributions by Mr. Lasbury to the industry. He established the first state licensed hospital in the United States for migrant agricultural workers. In 1968, Senator Harrison Williams of New Jersey inspected the Windsor Labor Camp and said that the association's operation was the "most enlightened" of any employer group he had seen in the country.

      In 1968, Mr. Lasbury retired. Upon Lasbury's retirement, Gerrit Krot, president of the Shade Tobacco Growers Agricultural Association, said that "no man in contemporary American agriculture contributed more to the industry's welfare."

      Besides his work in the Association, he had many other interests. Lasbury was the first president of the Connecticut Morgan Horse Club. He served as a director of the Connecticut Antiquarian and Landmarks Society. He was an avid trout fisherman and fox hunter and collected antique duck decoys.

      Ralph C. Lasbury, Jr. died of a heart attack on March 18, 1979, in Winter Park, Florida. He was 72. When he died, he left his wife, Cecilia Chase Lasbury; two sons, Ralph C. Lasbury and Joshua C. Lasbury; and two daughters, Cecilia Johnson and Abigail Fitzgerald.



      Scope and Contents

      The collection documents a significant portion of the professional activities of Ralph C. Lasbury, Jr. over a period of fifty years as the head of Connecticut regional agricultural marketing and employer groups. Minutes, correspondence, reports, leases, fiscal reports, copies of state legislative activities, and newspaper articles document the establishment, opening, and operation of the Connecticut Regional Market, a venue for the sale of Connecticut agricultural commodities. It also contains minutes, correspondence, membership lists, reports, and negotiations on behalf of the British West Indies Employers' Association. Lasbury represented the interests of tobacco growers, traveled extensively for the Association's executive committee, and met regularly with Caribbean governmental officials.
    • (Research):NOTES FOR RALPH CHERECK LASBURY:
      1930 CENSUS South Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut 262A
      Lasbury, Ralph C, head, 24, 1st married at 24, CT, CT, CT, Tobacco farmer
      Cecelia D, wife, 24, 1st married at 24, ME, PA, PA

      Maine City Directories show Ralph and Cecelia also owned a summer home in Camden, Knox, Maine

      OBITUARY
      By George Bradgon (regular correspondent for the Tobacco International)
      Lasbury, Connecticut Valley head who wrought labor reform, dies
      Ralph C. Lasbury Jr., one of the colorful figures in the history of tobacco-growing in the Connecticut River Valley, died March 18 at his winter home, Winter Park, Fla. Death came suddenly from a heart attack. He was 72. Under Lasbury's direction, the valley's growers of high-priced cigar-wrapper leaf drew national attention in the improvement of migrant farm workers' working and housing conditions. He was executive director of the Shade Tobacco Growers Agricultural Association in Connecticut and Massachusetts for 26 years, until retirement in 1968. At his retirement, the then- president of the association, Gerrit Krot. declared that no man in contemporary American agriculture contributed more to the industry's welfare. Such contributions were also referred to by Krot when Doris Rockwell, Lasbury's assistant, retired at the same time. He said she "also pioneered in capably administering the association's Youth Camp Program, the biggest farm youth employment program in the country, as well as our Farm Workers Hospital, the first and still the only establishment of its kind. " A tall, spare man, Lasbury was an outspoken individualist. He worked hard and played hard, taking pride in his ability to hunt ducks and coons, and to judge and ride horses. He was also proud of the fact that, to some extent, Indian blood flowed in his veins. Comparatively few knew that his middle name was Cherokee, his paternal grandmother being a member of that tribe. This in no way conflicted with the fact that one of the gifts of the American Indian to modern society was tobacco. Outside the door to his office stood a cigar-store Indian, and on the wall behind his desk hung a picture of one of his favorite horses. At a birthday party some time ago for a now-deceased grower named Thrall, Lasbury paid one of his highest tributes when declaring, "Oliver J. Thrall is the best coon-hunter in New England." Another hobby was collecting antique duck decoys, 200 of which Lasbury once owned. He helped popularize the Morgan horse and was the owner of the former national champion gelding, Windcrest Fireball. Lasbury was the first president of the Connecticut Morgan Horse Club. One of his first memories of the tobacco business occurred when, hardly old enough to walk, he was strapped to the buckboard of his father's wagon and rode while the older Lasbury inspected his 225 acres of broadleaf tobacco, grown for use as cigar binder

      Lasbury finished his high school education in Winter Park, Fla., after his father sold his tobacco farm and moved south. While completing his education at Rollins College in Winter Park, he met his future wife, Cecilia Justice Chase. Mrs. Lasbury's family established Chase Groves, near Orlando, in which citrus business the fourth generation is still in active operation.

      Ralph Lasbury returned to Connecticut and was appointed the first executive director of the Shade Tobacco Group in 1942 as a result of criticism aimed by the Connecticut State Department of Labor at the conditions surrounding employment of youth in tobacco fields and sheds. Children only eight years of age worked 9 1/2 hours a day, six days a week on some farms; there was criticism of housing, unsanitary living conditions, unsafe transportation, and lack of supervision in some cases.

      Lasbury was called to his job as a result of his volunteer work with the Connecticut Defense Council at the outbreak of World War II, when he was assigned to take charge of farm labor. As his first job with the shade group, he drew up corrective regulations and obtained acceptance by the growers. The regulations were put in effect voluntarily in 1942, becoming the basis for Connecticut's pioneering Farm Labor Youth Law of 1947.

      During the harvest season, 1968, Senator Harrison Williams of New Jersey. chairman of the Senate Migratory Labor Committee, inspected the shade growers' labor camp in Windsor, Conn.. with its modern housing, recreational and cafeteria facilities, representing a $2,000,000 investment. The association's operation was the "most enlightened" of any employer group in the nation he had visited, Senator Wiliams said. That year the shade growers employed a peak total of 20,000 farm hands with a $27 million payroll. Beginning with Lasbury's appointment and lasting until a few years after his retirement, growers operated a unique program, bringing West Indian residents annually for the season. They formed a core of experienced farm adults. Thousands annually were thus recruited, under a contract providing round trip air fare. Jamaicans were hired for many years, until enactment of alien work laws caused a switch to Puerto Ricans. Four years ago, after protracted labor troubles, the importation program was dropped, and domestic labor substituted.

      A memorial service for Ralph Lasbury will be held May 19 at. 2:00 p.m. at the Congregational Church of South Windsor, Conn., in this the town where he lived most of his life

      ANOTHER OBITUARY [http://windsorhistoricalsociety.org/fa_lasbury.html] SAYS:

      "Ralph C. Lasbury, Jr. died of a heart attack on March 18, 1979, in Winter Park, Florida. He was 72. When he died, he left his wife, Cecilia Chase Lasbury; two sons, Ralph C. Lasbury and Joshua C. Lasbury; and two daughters, Cecilia Johnson and Abigail Fitzgerald"